Towing 940 Turbo

  #21  
Old 11-23-2010, 07:04 PM
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before ordering a brake controller, I'd stop by a trailer specialist (often attached to an RV store) and look at a variety of them, figure out what would fit in your car. the brake controller really should be within reach of the driver, as it has some adjustments (typically centering, gain, and manual brake override). they tend to be kinda big and clunky as they are usually installed in big pickups and vans.

you'll ALSO need a seperate light controller module. I usually install these in the left rear storage well, they have to be wired to the tail lights, and the hitch plug. the 4-wire light boat kind I just leave the trailer plug in the well on 5' or so of wire when I'm not using it, and snake it out under the tailgate when I need it.

installing a Draw-Tite type hitch to a volvo wagon is freekin' EASY. the studs are already in place, but they are rather gummed up with underbody coating, you'll want some solvent to get that crap off. its certainly easier if you can jack the back of the car up. also IIRC, on the 940 wagon, you'll need to cut a rectangular hole in the rear plastic skirt, the reciever pokes out through that.

you should decide what sort of trailer plug you want to use. campers usually prefer the bigass 7 blade kind such as are found on big SUVs and trucks, but those are overkill on a wagon. there's a smaller 7 pin round connector that can be used, for this, you could forgo a permanently mounted socket, and just keep the socket plus harness wire coiled up in that left rear storage well, and bring it out under your tailgate when you need it.
 
  #22  
Old 11-23-2010, 10:05 PM
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Pierce - thanks for al the help .. I will look into the Draw-Tite brand hitch and that is a good idea for the trailer plug in ... would be handy to store it it the well when not in use. I would think the controller module would be simple to hook into the wiring? and I'll check with some RV dealers in the area .. I will post back how things go .. it will be after the Holidays ... I guess with the studs in place Volvo already had plans for these wagons to tow .... thanks again friend
 
  #23  
Old 11-23-2010, 11:17 PM
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The trailer light controller in the back needs a decent gauge power wire, a good ground, and taps the left turn, right turn, brake, and parking lights, and has 3 outputs to the trailer running lights, left turn/brake, right turn/brake.

the trailer brake controller in the dash needs battery power, good ground, ignition power, brake light switch (from under the dash), and has the electric brake power output that has to be run back to the trailer connector.

the brake battery charge relay is connected to heavy gauge battery power and a good ground, ignition power as a control signal, and a heavy gauge power wire back to the trailer connector. you can use this trailer charge power wire to power the light controller (then the trailer lights would only work if the vehicle is running, thats probably acceptable). I'd probably put this power relay under the dash near the wiring for the brake controller.

btw, while I've usually run my stereo and trailer wiring along/under the drivers door sill, I noted in a Volvo 940 service document that they suggested running custom wiring along the base of the center spine, on the passenger side, and this makes a LOT of sense. you'll probably have to unbolt the passenger seat to do this, and remove the kick panels on both sides to access the under-dash wiring. while you're at it, run a separate power and stereo audio cables so you can put a subwoofer and amp back there some day (on my 850 wagon, I removed the 3rd seat cushions and installed a high efficiency compact amp under the floor panel, and put a small sub box in the corner behind back seat, the speaker wire unplugs so I can remove the box if its in the way.
 
  #24  
Old 11-24-2010, 02:39 AM
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You guys have some complex brace controllers over there! All the different ones I fit are four wire connections. Power and ground, brake light signal and the output to the trailer brakes.
As these are a safety device. We run twin core wire direct from the battery, through a auto resetting circuit breaker on the positive side, straight to the controller. We also run twin core to the trailer plug and just pick up the brake signal there, it's easier on multi wire brake switches, saves trying to probe around up under the dash.
A company called Redarc sells a very nice brake controller, it has a remote light and control **** for the unit, the box can mount anywhere in any orientation. All you need do is drill two small holes in dash and fit the **** and the lamp. If I had to recommend any controller, it would be this one for it's ease of use and installation, plus reliability.
http://redarc.com.au/products-and-se...ake-controller
Earlier when I said to fit a transmission cooler, I should've been more specific. I meant to fit a large, aftermarket transmission cooler. Stock coolers on all cars are barely adequate for getting the groceries.
When towing a lot, I also shorten the flush interval on the transmission by half.

Regards, Andrew.
 

Last edited by Typhoon; 11-24-2010 at 02:42 AM.
  #25  
Old 11-24-2010, 02:49 AM
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the two brake controllers I've installed had 5 wires, the 5th wire above what you listed was to turn it off so you don't drain the vehicle battery when the car is stopped. the ones I chose were pendulum (actually solid state) inertial proportional controllers. you have to adjust a **** on these for the angle they are mounted so the brakes are 'neutral' when your vehicle is neither braking nor accelerating, then they have a gain **** for how aggressive you want the braking. they brake proportional to your decelleration, so if you're just lightly slowing down, the trailer brakes are applied lightly, if you brake hard, the trailer brakes are applied hard too. this is really effective.

there's another kind thats timed, longer you're brakeing, the harder it brakes. and then there's just simple on/off ones with a brake strength ****, like the one you linked.
 
  #26  
Old 11-25-2010, 12:46 AM
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Those ones that I linked slowly ramp up braking effort over a predetermined time, it's not a bad compromise, they'll also control up to three axles. They're good value.
There are controllers out there that will allow you to adjust the ramp up time, force and some that will even learn how much force to put through the trailer brakes.
The pendulum controllers are simple but there are a whole lot better units out there now for a similar price. You should look into them next time you need one. Pendulum controllers have some interesting shortcomings, especially on rough roads and hilly terrain/ stop start traffic.
We've never had a cutstomer complain about a brake controller draining a battery, if they don't sense a trailer attached, they draw virtually nothing, certainly no more than a radio for example. I think you could safely disregard that fifth wire.

Regards, Andrew.
 
  #27  
Old 11-25-2010, 01:06 AM
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the 'pendulum' controller I put in my van about 5 years ago is actually a solid state accelerometer, not an actual pendulum. you still have to null it out on level, but its supposed to notice the vehicle is on a slope before you apply your brakes, and adjust its modulation appropriately. I dunno. I was told it was the best kind to use for mid sized trailers like I wanted to tow. I think the one I got is rated for 2 axles (4 electric brakes).
 
  #28  
Old 11-05-2018, 01:02 AM
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Default Hello dont tow over 3500lbs with factory Volvo hitch

[QUOTE=2hello40nc;245429]I am looking to see what the chances are of using my 94 940 Turbo wagon to tow a 17' single axle camper would be? I have no clue what the camper weighs but beings it is a single axle I am sure it's not really heavy or they would have used tandem axles... I do know the tongue weight is above 200 as I can not lift it .... has anyone one here used a 940 Turbo to tow?

Thanks in advance for any input.[/QUOT

Hello , I wouldn't tow over 3500lbs trailer brakes with factory Volvo hitch that is the right one. 1600-2000 lbs max with no brakes on trailer. Sure the engine probably handle it. But stopping over the limits can damage brakes, suspension, transmission. Follow your owner manual. I have heard of people upgrading there Volvo's so they can tow 7000 lbs with new brake systems, suspension, performance engine upgrades and huge transmission coolers. Also have to worry about getting caught by the police with a over weight vehicle. Big fines not to mention points on your license. I would rent a pick up or SUV to tow such a big trailer. Won't go over the limit. Have to add on the max weight of the vehicle including trailer. That specification is mostly based on the brakes.
 
  #29  
Old 11-05-2018, 01:22 AM
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Default Towing 940 Turbo

Originally Posted by pierce View Post
I've towed with a 960 wagon (same chassis, but straight 6 'whiteblock'). it handled pretty well with a 2000 lb trailer. with 2000 lbs, you definitely want trailer brakes, but this likely means you'd need a brake controller in the vehicle. I towed without trailer brakes (it was actually an overloaded 1200 lb trailer) and it was pretty sketchy doing down steep grades, I did a lot of engine braking.

the camper's weight gross maximum weight should be on a plate somewhere on the front left side. if you empty your water and dump tanks, you save 100s of lbs.

I would think the turbo 4 would do OK, just take it easy, stay out of overdrive, keep your speed down, and take it real easy going up hills so things don't overheat.

I believe the 740/760/940/960 wagons are rated at like 3500 lbs tow, and 300 lbs downforce on the hitch. do note, you have to take that downforce off your GVWR and rear axle load, this basically means you can't carry much in the car safely if you're towing a heavy load (2 largish adults + 300 lbs == 700 lbs... whats the total payload?)
Sounds ok , 3000 rpm wont hurt it. Just check fluids every few hundred kms.
 
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