Tire bolts on too tight - Volvo Forums - Volvo Enthusiasts Forum


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Old 06-26-2012, 08:08 PM
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Default Tire bolts on too tight

Today I was trying to replace front brake pads on my 2002 V70, but whoever worked last on my left front tire must have held the impact wrench on for a minute on each! All the bolts are so tight that I twisted the heck out of the tire iron, and bent the steel pipe I used as a lever, and I still haven't gotten that tire off! I have arranged to borrow an electric impact wrench tomorrow, plan to give that a try. Just sounding off....hope everyone else having a good day!
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Old 06-27-2012, 05:59 AM
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That's pretty normal. I couldn't get any of the wheels of my car when I got it. Get yourself a cross lug wrench form somewhere for less than $20, and you can barrow my 550 lb nephew for a few minutes.

You should also put anti-seize on the bolts when you go back on. Hope none of them break off on you. Maybe you should drive around and brake a lot to heat the wheels up a little.
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:12 PM
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Default Problem solved

Problem now solved. Got the last three lug bolts off by holding an impact wrench on them, then following up by using breaker bar with steel pipe extension. Didn't break any bolts off. This is the first time I dealt with lug bolts. I prefer the ol' lug nuts, but then these may just take some getting used to. Thanks for the info....
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Old 07-13-2012, 09:43 PM
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FYI, the torque spec for the wheel bolts is 103 ft lbs. Even at that, it should not have taken all that you went through to get them off. Just be sure to use a torque wrench when you put your wheels back on.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:38 AM
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JUST A TIP
Use lite gearbox oil, put some drops on the threads next time you tight them, they will always in future come of easy.

Cheers
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Old 09-06-2012, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by VOLVO_V70-2_T5 View Post
JUST A TIP
Use lite gearbox oil, put some drops on the threads next time you tight them, they will always in future come of easy.

Cheers
It is risky to use just any lubricant on lug bolts because if one then tightens to the specified torque there would then be too much preload tension on the bolts. The specified torque is based on the bolts being dry, unlubed. Much of the applied torque is balanced by friction in the threads and if this is reduced then the applied torque will tension the bolts more than is desirable. This could snap bolts or warp the part the bolts are threaded into. Google this subject and you will find some surprising information.
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:19 PM
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Are you saying that you should NOT use anti-seize on the bolts?
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:43 PM
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I used to use use anti-seize on spark plugs on my 1991 Dodge Spirit but I have never used it on our Volvos.

I have never used anti-seize on lug nuts or lug bolts, but I do not live in an area of high use of road salt in winter. It could be that antiseize is formulated to not be a particularly good lubricant. It might not reduce the friction in the threads, and might not cause major problems if it were used.

Last edited by JamesG; 01-10-2018 at 05:09 AM.
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:24 AM
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Wow we had the same problem with a 2002 s80, i broke 2 ratchets, 2 breakerbars and my wife had a shop in the town she works at try and he broke his stuff, finally we went to discount tire and the brought out the big mama jama for semis to get it off.

all is well now, thank god lol
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:15 AM
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Are you saying that you should NOT use anti-seize on the bolts?
Correct. Lug nuts/bolts should not be lubricated with anything. Clean any rust and debris from the threads with a wire brush and install them dry using a torque wrench.
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:24 AM
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Well, I use anti-seize and have not had a problem with bolts coming loose or getting stuck. I put it on the mating surfaces of the hub to wheel (contact points), the bolt threads and the head of the bolt. Have not had any problems yet so I'll keep doing it. Have seen to many problems with people not being able to get their weels off which causes all kinds of dangerous situations as well as not being able to change a flat in 5 minutes on the road.

Do what you will, anti-seize for me. BTW, anyone have a torque wrench in their tire change kit?
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by porkchop112699 View Post
Wow we had the same problem with a 2002 s80, i broke 2 ratchets, 2 breakerbars and my wife had a shop in the town she works at try and he broke his stuff, finally we went to discount tire and the brought out the big mama jama for semis to get it off.

all is well now, thank god lol
Impact wrenches used for truck wheels can produce over 1,000 ft.lbs. of torque.

Any lug bolt that's been overtorqued like that should be replaced. If the vehicle has lug nuts the studs should be replaced.

Of course nobody does this. Everybody rolls the dice and most people get away with it. But wheel-off accidents are surprisingly common. And big money-makers for personal injury lawyers.
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by rspi View Post
Well, I use anti-seize and have not had a problem with bolts coming loose or getting stuck. I put it on the mating surfaces of the hub to wheel (contact points), the bolt threads and the head of the bolt. Have not had any problems yet so I'll keep doing it. Have seen to many problems with people not being able to get their weels off which causes all kinds of dangerous situations as well as not being able to change a flat in 5 minutes on the road.

Do what you will, anti-seize for me. BTW, anyone have a torque wrench in their tire change kit?
I'm not advocating this but 95 ft.lbs. is fairly easy to judge without a torque wrench. It's a pretty good tug on an 18" breaker bar.

Using anti-sieze on your lug bolt threads means you're overtorquing them by some amount in the 10% to 40% range. It's not enough to cause a problem. Unlike the tire jockeys that impact wrench them down to 300 ft.lbs. That is a problem as it stretches the bolts. Doesn't take too many repetitions of that to break the bolt.
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Old 09-15-2012, 05:12 AM
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you bring up a good point, that lug bolt was probaly stretched. this is my first experience with lug bolts, not lut nuts, kinda different. But i am smart enought to not use a impact gun on either lmao
thanks again, looks like i will be ordering new ones now
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:45 AM
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Use of anti-seize compound reduces required tightening torque by 20%. So there is no risk to using it on lug bolts. These bolts are subject to over torque routinely by impact wrenches. Controlled torque application and using anti-seize is no risk.

http://www.circlebolt.com/docs/tech-...-Selection.pdf
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Old 02-17-2014, 11:56 AM
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This is for RSPI- I DO KEEP A TORQUE WRENCH IN MY TIRE CHANGE KIT!! I have had problems with over tight lug bolts when putting new tires on my S70 and it caused brake flutter and steering wheel vibrations so I bought a cheap torque wrench and keep it in my trunk.
Thanx, S70fanman
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Old 02-19-2014, 08:07 AM
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I have 2 torque wrenches, which are usually handy when I have a wheel off. However, I still don't use them.

I have stopped using anti-seize on the threads, only on the bolt heads and mating surfaces. I do use a medium or large cross lug nut tool to take them off and put them on.

Tightening/torquing out of sequence or uneven torquing will cause rotors to warp.
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Old 02-21-2014, 08:22 PM
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An overtightened wheel lug, will damage the alloy lug seat on the wheel and the lugs won't rotate easily when tightened, which will cause uneven torque on the lug. Better to sand a little the lug seat on the wheel.
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Old 12-14-2017, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rspi View Post
Are you saying that you should NOT use anti-seize on the bolts?
I use a product called Rusfre on the one piece style bolts, after years of using other products this seems to work the best. BUT only on the conical section of the bolt. AND WHY DO I DO THIS, cause I cant get the lug bolt off otherwise. AND this clearly includes torque em to the specified torque!!!!!! Of course changing to the newer 2 piece bolt style works a whole lot better all around!!!!!! and I have never been forced to use a thread lube on the newer style as well, but they do, per the manual require more torque to install. Also a reminder to use a sacrificial socket to remove the bolts when the one piece ones stick, just hit the socket on the head of the stuck bolts, usually works great.
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Old 01-04-2018, 05:45 PM
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I have noticed this problem on older Volvo models. The newer models have lug bolts with a floating cup. The older ones need lube not only on the threads but on the cup too.

They can be fun getting loose. The breaker bar with an extension, parking brake set, is about the only way to get these off.
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