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S40 cel

  #1  
Old 03-12-2019, 03:01 PM
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Question S40 cel

A month ago (during the cold snap) my CEL went on. Took it to the dealer and they ran a diagnostic--but couldn't give me a definitive answer. They said the pings (or whatever) were intermittent for either the Flash Box trap or the catalytic converter. So they reset the CEL and told me to bring it back when it goes off again. Well, guess what-it went off. The prices they gave for the two items together are more than the trade in value. My questions are--is this a normal 147K mi repair? what else usually goes at this mileage and above ? I have owned it for 7 years now and have taken it in for every oil change and maintenance. Only things I have had to replace is the air conditioner compressor, brakes, and tires. Is it worth keeping or am I on the top of a slippery slope ? Its a 2010.
 

Last edited by Murreliza; 03-12-2019 at 03:10 PM.
  #2  
Old 03-12-2019, 03:59 PM
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No one can answer that without knowing the codes that your car is actually throwing.
 
  #3  
Old 03-12-2019, 05:05 PM
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curious what a "flash box trap" is. Perhaps the tech was referring to the "flame trap" which is an OG term for the PCV system's oil trap. At 150K miles, its pretty common for the PCV system to become clogged and it will need to be serviced as you risk having engine seals push out of the engine. The PCV system vents the unburnt gases in the crankcase back into the intake to be burned. When the ports in the engine and hoses clog up with oil sludge, the pressure needs to go somewhere - usually out the oil fill cap, the dipstick or it will push out cam and crank seals turning your engine into a bleeder. Quick test is to remove the oil fill cap, put a latex (surgeon's) glove over the hole and start the car. If the glove inflates, you need to service the PCV. If it puffs in and out or sucks in, you are good. Here's thing, I'm not sure what CEL code would indicate a bad PCV... If I were to guess, the cost to service the PCV system would be in the $600-700 range. $200 in parts and 4 hours labor give or take.

As to the CEL code you saw suggesting you need a new catalytic converter... that is typically a P0420 code for "catalytic converer efficiency code". That can be caused by a bunch of other things besides the cat, ie intake air leak, exhaust leak, bad rear 02 sensor, wiring harness issue etc. If it does turn out to be the catalytic converter, the cost for a genuine Volvo replacement part is about $1000 - but after market is considerably cheaper. I'd expect to also replace the O2 sensors at the same time so worst case is this would be a $1500 job using Volvo parts, under $1000 using aftermarket. I'd also say its 50/50 whether the cat is truly bad or some other parts need to be sorted out.

So for next steps, I'd stop by an Autozone and borrow an OBD2 scanner to view the fault codes and report back. Also check Youtube for vids on testing for a clogged PCV system and try the rubber glove test.
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:21 AM
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Default Thank you

I will be taking it back to the dealership on Monday to get it re-diagnosed I will ask for the codes this time. Your estimates are pretty close to the ones I received from the dealer but there is a repair place that quoted me less. Hopefully it is the flame trap and not the catalytic converter. I'm not in the position of wanting another car payment .


At 150K miles, its pretty common for the PCV system to become clogged and it will need to be serviced as you risk having engine seals push out of the engine. The PCV system vents the unburnt gases in the crankcase back into the intake to be burned. When the ports in the engine and hoses clog up with oil sludge, the pressure needs to go somewhere - usually out the oil fill cap, the dipstick or it will push out cam and crank seals turning your engine into a bleeder. Quick test is to remove the oil fill cap, put a latex (surgeon's) glove over the hole and start the car. If the glove inflates, you need to service the PCV. If it puffs in and out or sucks in, you are good. Here's thing, I'm not sure what CEL code would indicate a bad PCV... If I were to guess, the cost to service the PCV system would be in the $600-700 range. $200 in parts and 4 hours labor give or take.

As to the CEL code you saw suggesting you need a new catalytic converter... that is typically a P0420 code for "catalytic converer efficiency code". That can be caused by a bunch of other things besides the cat, ie intake air leak, exhaust leak, bad rear 02 sensor, wiring harness issue etc. If it does turn out to be the catalytic converter, the cost for a genuine Volvo replacement part is about $1000 - but after market is considerably cheaper. I'd expect to also replace the O2 sensors at the same time so worst case is this would be a $1500 job using Volvo parts, under $1000 using aftermarket. I'd also say its 50/50 whether the cat is truly bad or some other parts need to be sorted out.

So for next steps, I'd stop by an Autozone and borrow an OBD2 scanner to view the fault codes and report back. Also check Youtube for vids on testing for a clogged PCV system and try the rubber glove test.[/QUOTE]
 
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