Volvo V40 A super safe wagon, this attainable Volvo offers something for everyone.

Timing Belt precautions!!

  #1  
Old 11-17-2007, 08:58 AM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default Timing Belt precautions!!

I am writing this post because there has kind of been a little debate lately about timing belts and the service intervals.
[/align]The post is to show why the timing belt should really be changed at about 70,000 miles instead of 105,000 like Volvo says it should be.
[/align]Also Make sure you replace the tensioner and idler pulleys as well.
[/align]I have some pics of belts I have replaced at work on cars.
[/align]I have the belts from a few of the different models the milage will vary between 70K and 80K. You will see how the belts crack at that milage.
[/align]I would not trust the belts like that on my own car. That's why I am making this post so that everyone is informed about the belts and what can happen if they break.
[/align]
[/align]I know not everyone has the money always to get the job done. I know how it is I have 4 kids and very little money. But the point I am trying to make is that it is better to pay between $700.00 to $800.00 or so. Rather than having to Junk the car or pay over $3000.00 to get the head rebuilt or replaced. Or maybe even more to have a new motor installed.
[/align]
[/align]I have my own theory on why they go bad faster on the 1999 and newer cars than on the older cars.
[/align]
[/align]I think it is because of how the timing covers are made.
[/align]The older cars all the heat that gets to the timing belt only comes from the front of the motor.
[/align]
[/align]The 1999 and newer cars the timing cover are different because of having the VVT valve in the cam cover. That allows all the heat from the top of the motor to access the timing belt and add more heat to that area causing the belt to go bad faster.
[/align]
[/align]On the 1993 to 1998 5 cylinders and 1994 to 1998 6 cylinders the timing belts could last a lot long but I wouldn't trust them either.
[/align]But that's my theory.
[/align]
[/align]Now onto the pictures the first batch will be the timing belt pictures with the model,year and milage that they were changed.
[/align]Then the last batch of pictures will be an idler and tensioner pulley from a S80.(Not as bad as I wanted for an example picture but will work.
[/align]Then finally a picture of an engine that had the belt break.
[/align]
[/align]This way everyone has an Idea of the entire situation.
[/align]Then you can make your own decisions from here.
[/align]
[/align]The first belt is from a 2000 S80 with 72,623 miles
[/align]Name:  Picture003.jpg
Views: 873
Size:  54.8 KB
[/align]Name:  Picture004.jpg
Views: 832
Size:  35.3 KB
[/align]The second belt is from a 2003 S40 with 73,746 miles
[/align]Name:  Picture005.jpg
Views: 854
Size:  55.2 KB
[/align]Name:  Picture006.jpg
Views: 863
Size:  39.7 KB
[/align]The last one is from a 2001 V70 with 82,700 miles
[/align]
[/align]
[/align]
[/align]Here is a tensioner if you look closely in one spot you will see where grease started coming out of the bearing.
[/align]
[/align]
[/align]Here is the idler same here both sides were spinning grease out.
[/align]Name:  Picture011-1.jpg
Views: 843
Size:  54.9 KB
[/align]Name:  Picture012-1.jpg
Views: 886
Size:  54.7 KB
[/align]If your serpentine belt looks like this replace it I have seen them break as well and get sucked into the engine and break the timing belt as well.
[/align]Name:  Picture009.jpg
Views: 884
Size:  42.4 KB
[/align]
[/align]So there is my post the pics might not be the best but should help some.
[/align]
Sorry here is the pics of the head and block.
Name:  Volvo008.jpg
Views: 999
Size:  48.6 KB
Name:  Volvo006.jpg
Views: 948
Size:  47.4 KB
 
  #2  
Old 03-28-2008, 11:04 AM
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

Hi, i have seen your post which gives advice about timing belt, but one of your pictures which shows the serpentine belt, whats wrong with that one? I cant see it or am i missing it?

thanks

 
  #3  
Old 03-29-2008, 08:57 AM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

Look just above at the serp belt. The cranks in the belt that run sideways in the pic aren't supposed to be there.
 
  #4  
Old 06-21-2008, 01:40 PM
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location:
Posts: 8
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

I agree, getting the belts replaced regularly will definitely save money! My Mother just bought a second hand car and I told her to get the belts done as I dont live anywhere near her, she didn't get them done and the timing belt broke, luckily for her I know a few people where she lives and she got a replacement engine fitted and reconditioned for the same price as having the belts done by a stealer! As a mechanic I always do the belts and a complete service on any second hand cars I buy, it's the only way to be sure of their condition!
 
  #5  
Old 11-21-2008, 04:50 PM
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

hi guys
i just bought v40 and it is on 108k. i was concern about the timing belt do you reccon iy would be changed?
and how can i get the code for the radio?
please
 
  #6  
Old 11-21-2008, 05:11 PM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

I would inspect the belt and see what it looks like.

Get the radio code from the local Dealer.
 
  #7  
Old 11-22-2008, 02:50 PM
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

is it visible from outside without taking any part off?
 
  #8  
Old 11-22-2008, 05:38 PM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

You can lift the cover up over the belt and inspect it. You have to unlatch the top cover then lift it up.
 
  #9  
Old 01-05-2009, 12:41 PM
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location:
Posts: 5
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

i have a friend who had s80 2.0t 1999 their timing belt went due to the oil cap being not put on probaly causing car engine to lose compression,throwing the timing out is this correct?
 
  #10  
Old 01-05-2009, 03:56 PM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default RE: Timing Belt precautions!!

Sorry but I do not believe that story.
 
  #11  
Old 02-13-2009, 09:38 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 29
Default

OK, I opened the cover, looked at the outside of the belt and the inside with a small mirror and flashlight, both sides look fine... the outside didn't show small horizontal cracks and the inside didn't show pieces missing, like the photos above show. The vehicle has 130,000 miles and I do not know whether it has ever been replaced. Based on its appearance does this indicate it is fine, possibly been replaced? Should I replace it anyway?
 
  #12  
Old 08-08-2009, 11:09 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
Default 2000 v40

I was told by the mechanics that i also need to replace a sprocket that drives the timing belt because it is a common problem and volvo has a newer design. I feal that they are trying to overcharge me anyway so I take my vehicle to another mechanic. Does anyone know anything about this sprocket?
 
  #13  
Old 08-08-2009, 11:40 PM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default

They must be talking about the tensioner or Idler which should be replaced with the belt.
 
  #14  
Old 08-11-2009, 06:44 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7
Default New info

Okay I found my work order. I had a really small oil leak and a check engine light problem, what the mechanic wants to replace is the cvt hub (solenoid) and seal since there is a new design. This is a simple repair which I have found enough information to do this myself. Other than that my timing belt and components need to be replaced, since it probably never has been done.
 
  #15  
Old 08-12-2009, 08:16 PM
tech's Avatar
Administrator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 36,351
Default

The VVT hubs are common to leak.
 
  #16  
Old 07-21-2011, 01:54 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1
Thumbs up radio code

hi there, if it is the genuine radio for the car you will need your reg No or the vin and they will give you the factory setting for that radio, if it still don't work you can take it that it is NOT the original and will have to pay to have it re-coded , cheers - pjay61
Originally Posted by tech View Post
I would inspect the belt and see what it looks like.

Get the radio code from the local Dealer.
 
  #17  
Old 08-26-2012, 06:41 AM
Junior Member
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3
Default Where do I look at the belt?

I just pursched a V40. I do not have any idea of where you are talking about to inspect the belt. Could you give me a description of where to look?

Can you suggest where to buy a manual to work on the car?

Thank you for the sticky.
 
  #18  
Old 02-14-2017, 02:13 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 9
Default 2000 Volvo S40 with slipped timing belt, no valve damage apparent!

Hi all,
I wanted to write a post about a my GF's volvo. My GF calls saying her car won't start. She's cranking and no combusion...she says maybe gas is out, engine computer throws 8 codes. Anyway, we find after cranking for collectively 5 min and a fireball of starter fluid coming out the intake, the timing belt has slipped off.
I'm a R&D engineer of 17yrs, with 6yrs in OE auto industry. I know design well, but like most enginerds my practical skills are not that of an expert mechanic. I do the internet research on this valve crashing issue and everyone and dealership say $5k for new engine, which is over 2x's more than the cost of the car, so that's not smart. Tensioner was the issue, bearing had fallen apart. Volvo original design on this tensioner is just a bit too skimpy on the thickness of the steel, as it had been bent from load, plus...just one bolt through the middle of a rotating bearing...they're just asking for this tensioner to come loose. Also, the alignment marks for the belt suck...I mean, notches in the plastic cover???
I call Dad, who has rebuilt 5 engines or so, and he says...interference blah blah blah engine or not, the engine is probably ok...so just to entertain him I replace the belt. Exhaust cam was 13 teeth off and intake was 5 off. Definitely waaay out of time, and we cranked the engine a lot without the cams moving. After belt replacement she purrs as smooth as ever. Used a string to hold the tensioner while adjusting, zip ties to keep belt on cams, and $60 for belt, idler, and tensioner. Success.
Did we just get lucky? I don't think so...here's my theory...when the timing belt is disconnected, the intake and exhaust cams like to rest in the closed position (if you turn these by hand, you will feel the cam-valve spring contact forcefully try to keep the valves in closed position). There's no way the cam would ever come to rest at the valve full open position if it's off the belt...it's like balancing a ball on top of another ball. The valve closed position is out of the way of the piston, obviously, and is where the cams will come to rest after belt breakage. I'd speculate the only time you'd crash valves into pistons is when the car is on road and cams have momentum and thus hit pistons as they slow down from the initial belt break. If the belt slips in a parking lot or at idle, those cams are likely not going to make the next turn; the will likely just come to rest with valves seated, which takes them out of harm's way So, I think it's safe to say that if belt breaks at high rpm there's likely trouble...low rpm your likely ok. Am I naive for believing this, or are the dealers and mechanics trying to drum up extra engine sales by saying "definitely wrecked valves"?
Anyway, good luck all,
Jared
 
  #19  
Old 02-14-2017, 03:07 PM
Senior Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,045
Default

We aren't just drumming up sales. The cams cannot possibly stop with all valves closed. Not sure how you got lucky, but you did. I have seen plenty of bent valves.
 
  #20  
Old 02-14-2017, 04:16 PM
Junior Member
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 9
Default

Ok, well fully closed or not, the cams come to rest in a non-interference position, which should at least be considered before you assume the valves are bent.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Timing Belt precautions!!


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.