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Timing Belt precautions!!

  #21  
Old 03-06-2011, 10:53 AM
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Default V70 T belts

This is an older post, but hopefully someone will drop in. I've never done a t-belt on a white block newer than our 98s, but now there's a 2005 too. I have to assume it's about the same as the later 98s. Any major differences I should be prepared for?
Thanks,
DS
 
  #22  
Old 03-06-2011, 11:18 AM
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Pretty much exactly the same.
I would mark the pulleys to cam cover before removing the belt to make sure they do not move. If they move just line up marks and go.
 
  #23  
Old 05-12-2011, 08:11 PM
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Just replaced my timing belt, idler pulley, and water pump at 105k miles in my T6. Amazingly, still no water leaks at the pump and the replaced timing belt did not have a single crack (in fact, it looks like new although a little dirty). Somewhere I must have picked up a guardian angel as this has been the best car I have ever owned.
 
  #24  
Old 05-17-2011, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by volvotechky View Post
Im gonna put some of my input on this, I still work at a dealer, All rubber made products overtime will crack like that, especially in heat situations, however that belt WILLNOT break, the tensioners and water pump will fail before that belt breaks.

That is how i purchased my 99S70, the ORIGINAL purchaser of this car never did ANY maintence aside from oil change and tires, and plugs when it started missing, the tensioner finally broke at 206,000miles, the belt never did break. I have seen some situations were the tensioners fail around 90-100k and volvo paid for them. after all it is a recommendation, you also have a better chance of volvo helping if you do your maintainence at the dealer.

I dont recall ever seeing a belt brake, i've always seen something else give way chewing up the belt.

Also the 5cyl Turbo XC90's are due at 120k and the 6cyl at due at 105k

This is my opinion and does reflect any negativity tward anyone who thinks it should be done sooner..
I have to agree with you. I have spent 40 years in the automotive field, as a mechanic, a salesmen and a dealer. In the past 15 years or so I have rarely if ever seen a timing belt break at anything under 200,000 miles. I have replaced belts on many vehicles with 125k miles that were like brand new. When a manufacturer says a belt should be replaced at 90k or 120k, etc. they are being very cautious in their estimate, and they know that there is little chance of a failure (under normal circumstances) of that belt for much longer than the recommended mileage. I tell my friends and family to not worry about changing the belt until at least 150k miles and even then it should still be in very serviceable condition. Just my own observations, if you don't agree go with your gut.
 
  #25  
Old 05-24-2011, 07:08 AM
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Just thought I'd throw my own experience into the mix here...

I changed the timing belt on my in-law's 2002 V70XC last year. It was WELL over the mileage that Volvo recommends. I can't recall exact mileage, but suffice it to say they should have been nearly halfway through the next one.

Anyway, as troubling as the cracks are in the belt itself, it didn't look that much worse than the pics posted of the belts with 80k in this thread. What was MORE troubling is that I was able to remove the belt completely with no effort without loosening the tensioner! They were very lucky I think that the car didn't jump time.

I've done a number of timing belts on different makes and models, and I think the Volvo was one of the easiest I've had to change, certainly no worse than any others. I'd say the accessory belt was more of a pain to install. All timing belts might seem scary to change due to the apparent high-risk, but it's a fairly straightforward procedure. As long at the timing marks all line up, you should be fine. Always a great idea to turn the engine over by hand a couple times after completing the install to make sure that the timing marks still line up and catch any binding that may happen in an incorrect install.

I didn't remove the harmonic balancer like volvo recommends to do in the procedure. Instead I removed the lower belt guide underneath and carefully walked the belt around the pulley. Worked like a champ.

EDIT: Oh yeah, the tensioner bearings were very loose as well... There was a lot of slop in the bearing but no noise from the engine. This could have died at any point which would have been just as bad as the belt breaking.
 

Last edited by geoffdaddy; 05-24-2011 at 07:10 AM.
  #26  
Old 05-24-2011, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by getagrp1k View Post
That just shows you how cheap Volvo parts are. A tensioner should NEVER go out or a pully for that matter. I have serios issues with my P.O.S XC90 that nobody can figure out. The dealer just wants cash and doesnt give 2 cents about your car, just the sale of a new one. I have 256000 miles on my chevy tahoe and not one problem from it.
I don't think you can really fault Volvo on this...most car manufacturers who have engines with timing belts require the belt to be replaced around 100k mi. Just a routine maintenance item along with the belt and the tensioner isn't that much.
 
  #27  
Old 05-24-2011, 07:16 AM
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Oh yeah, one last thing. I was concerned about whether or not to replace the water pump while doing this...some manufacturers recommend changing the water pump as part of the R&R of timing belt (including Volvo at one point years ago). My local dealer assured me that they rarely see water pumps go on the V70s, so I just inspected it and went back with the new tensioner and belt.
 
  #28  
Old 08-02-2011, 12:45 PM
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I am currently looking to purchase a 2004 XC90 T6 2.9L Twin Turbo. It seems that the previous owner had the timing belt snap and unfortunately had a cut rate mechanic make the repair. He put a new new water pump tensioner and pulley on it with the new belt and replaced bent valves . . and just recently put a new axle on passenger side and a new torque top motor mount. The car does not run apparently the motor is not getting enough compression when turned over.

My question is what are the possible issues with the motor, new head, motor? I know there may be a couple of possibilities but im just looking for the full range of possible costs here. Before purchasing I plan on having Volvo look at it but before I run the expense of towing/inspection I wanted to know what I was getting into.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
  #29  
Old 06-25-2013, 06:13 AM
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Very interesting Thread on Timing belts...I have an 07 XC90 and had the alternator pulley snapped therefore loosing electrical power to steer the wheels....Ive sent it to the Volvo shop for a quote...as expected the quote was high...but what surprised me was their recommendation to change the Timing belt-tensioner and pulley for an additional 730USD charge!!! my Xc90 is at 113KMs done and after reading this thread...I think its a good move to have it replaced...my plan is to keep the Volvo for sometime...
 
  #30  
Old 10-01-2013, 05:01 PM
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Just chiming in with my experience I'm having now. 05 XC90 T6 160K mileage.
Timing belt looks pretty damn good, it was the POS plastic outer sleeve on the tensioner that failed. Found it in the bottom of the T-belt compartment, in about 6 pieces. No matter how hard I looked all the replacements still have the POS plastic sleeve.
Kinda like that stupid plastic elbow they put on the T-stat housing. Another bright idea.
 
  #31  
Old 10-08-2013, 07:57 PM
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This is a great conversation... I have a 2002 XC70 with 150,000 miles. My niece now is the proud owner. However, she now tells me that a repair shop says the cam shaft and crank shaft seals need to be replaced along with the timing belts. Can anyone tell me about how much this will set me back for? And...I'm definitely not a mechanic, just a Volvo for life guy for the last 30 years. I currently own a 2012 XC70-T6 and love it. Please share some wisdom on me if you can...
 
  #32  
Old 08-07-2014, 12:49 PM
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Default Question for TECH about timing belt

I just bought another Volvo on Saturday, a 2008 XC90 AWD with the 3.2 motor 103000 on the clock. I asked the salesman if the timing belt has ever been changed and they could not find any record of it so included in the deal was a timing belt job to be scheduled later this week. I got a call from him this morning and he tells me that there is no timing belt that it is a chain and does not need to be replaced. Is this true? I have a 1996 960 and a 2002 S80 that both have the 2.9 engine and they have belts not chains. Thanks for any help.
 
  #33  
Old 08-07-2014, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ingydrummer View Post
I just bought another Volvo on Saturday, a 2008 XC90 AWD with the 3.2 motor 103000 on the clock. I asked the salesman if the timing belt has ever been changed and they could not find any record of it so included in the deal was a timing belt job to be scheduled later this week. I got a call from him this morning and he tells me that there is no timing belt that it is a chain and does not need to be replaced. Is this true? I have a 1996 960 and a 2002 S80 that both have the 2.9 engine and they have belts not chains. Thanks for any help.
It's a chain.
 
  #34  
Old 08-07-2014, 01:57 PM
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Thanks ES6T, thats a great load off my mind. The salesman is actually giving me a check for $800.00 as well. He said that was the cost of the timing belt job they agreed on when we bought the car. SWEET
 
  #35  
Old 08-22-2014, 10:55 PM
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Default 5-cyl VVT cam timing

I just acquired a 2004 V70 AWD with 130K on it. I don't know the previous owners and there was no record of a timing belt change. I watched a few videos several(!) times and went about doing it myself. I got it apart and saw a nice "NAPA" logo on a belt that did not look very old.

After breathing a sigh of relief, I've started to wonder if, while the unknown mechanic did that job, the VVT could be off on either camshaft. The cam and crank marks line up and there are no codes, but I vaguely recall reading, somewhere, that this can happen. There's a big off-idle hesitation, so I wonder if one or both VVT's are off and if I can fix it myself.
 
  #36  
Old 12-31-2014, 10:59 AM
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In response to original post...

-- Why don't they build clearance into these engines so if the belt breaks no big deal?
-- Are timing chains much better than belts and if so, then why don't they use chains?
 
  #37  
Old 12-31-2014, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by sunstardude View Post
In response to original post...

-- Why don't they build clearance into these engines so if the belt breaks no big deal?
-- Are timing chains much better than belts and if so, then why don't they use chains?
I'm not an engineer, but fuel economy is probably part of the reason. If there is more clearance, then the air/fuel mixture cannot be compressed as much and may not burn as completely (or may need more fuel).

A chain is heavier than a belt, so it uses more energy to turn.

It isn't up to the engineers to design a vehicle for people who don't want to maintain their vehicles.
 
  #38  
Old 01-01-2015, 12:28 PM
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It takes negligible power to turn either a timing belt or a timing chain. If I recall correctly the GM 4-cyl in my 1981 Pontiac Phoenix (the so called "Iron Duke" engine) had a timing gear.


I think a timing chain must be more expensive to implement because the chain itself is more costly and it must have lubrication from the engine oiling system. So the timing chain cover has a gasket which can leak. Also I have read that a timing chain generates more noise than a belt.


Timing chains and gears last longer than timing belts, but they do not necessarily last the life of the engine, and they are more costly to replace.


The Volvo 5-cyl is a so called "interference" design. If the timing belt breaks or slips too much, then pistons will strike valves. Older lower power engines were non-interference designs. It could be that the interference design is necessitated by the use of 4 valves per cylinder. I had a 1991 Dodge Spirit with the 2.5L 4-cyl with 2 valves per cylinder which was a non-interference design developing 100 hp. I never worried about the timing belt breaking and damaging the engine. The non-turbo 2.4L 5-cyl in my 2004 V70 develops 168 hp, but if the timing belt or tensioner would fail, then that would be it for that vehicle.
 

Last edited by JamesG; 01-01-2015 at 03:04 PM.
  #39  
Old 01-02-2015, 02:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ES6T View Post
I'm not an engineer, but fuel economy is probably part of the reason. If there is more clearance, then the air/fuel mixture cannot be compressed as much and may not burn as completely (or may need more fuel).

A chain is heavier than a belt, so it uses more energy to turn.
Somewhat correct.

An interference engine achieves a desired compression ratio at lower cost, allows the use of more valves per cylinder (four versus two, say) and more valve lift and duration for improved fuel economy and increased power.

A timing belt system is cheaper and quieter than a timing chain and does improve fuel economy a small amount due to reduced friction (not weight).
 
  #40  
Old 01-06-2015, 12:28 AM
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My experience with the timing belt I changed on my 05 xc90 T6 with 150k, the belt was still in great condition. It was the tensionor coming apart throwing engine codes. Went ahead and changed belt, idler and tensionor since I was in there. Was very easy job I did in 4 hours to save the $800 Volvo wanted to do the job. Only $150 in parts. What took the longest was trying to figure out how to loosen the 22mm nut on crank pulley, very very tight. Impact didn't help, had to wedge break over bar and socket on nut and frame while wife bumped the starter.
 

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