Volvo S80 A performance sedan that offers top notch luxury, outstanding handling and so much more.

Front Wheel Bearing

  #1  
Old 09-05-2018, 05:54 PM
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Default Front Wheel Bearing

Hey guys. Well looks like another S80 project. Looks like it's most likely a bad wheel bearing. My understanding is the replacement part is "wheel hub assembly".

- Has anyone replaced a front wheel bearing on a 2008 S80 (or similar vintage)?
- Is this something a DIY person can do?
- Any special tools required?
- Any watch-outs?

I've been doing my own auto repair stuff for quite some time...so my skill level is pretty good & have a good selection of tools. Wanted to get some opinions before I order parts...and dive in.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 09-05-2018, 06:01 PM
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The brakes need to be removed to get access to the steering knuckle.

The basic procedure is to remove the strut from the steering knuckle. Unbolt the ABS wire. In our shop, we also disconnect the tie rod at the knuckle. We've also been undoing the lower ball joint to get the knuckle off the car.

Once you have everything away from the steering knuckle, you need to unbolt the end bolt on the drive axle and push the drive axle through the bearing. Now remove the steering knuckle and bearing.

With the knuckle on the bench, remove the bolts on the rear that hold the bearing on the knuckle. Depending upon what part of the country you are in, you might have this thing frozen to the knuckle from rust. Here in Alabama everything comes apart like you are in heaven since no rust here.

Clean up the edge of the knuckle and install the new bearing.
 
  #3  
Old 09-05-2018, 09:30 PM
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Hey Tony thanks for the detailed info.

A few questions:

1. Just to verify. You saying the wheel bearing hub assembly does not need to be pressed out & the new bearing assy pressed in? That it just needs to be unbolted on the back from the steering knuckle & removed (assuming the bearing assy is not frozen)?

2. Is there any chance the bearing assy can be removed from the steering knuckle while still on the car...without disconnecting the tie rod and the lower ball joint? I know that this may sound like a silly question if it's actually physically impossible...but I haven't gotten in their yet to see things. And of course there's the CV joint drive shaft as well. I don't mind the extra disassembly hassle if it is possible.

3. If the tie rod end & lower ball joint are disconnected...will this result in the car needing a front end alignment after reassembled?

Thanks again!
 
  #4  
Old 06-25-2019, 01:26 PM
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Hello everyone. Believe it or not...I posted this question 9 months ago (last September)...and have been delaying doing this repair for multiple reasons. Lol

I now have the replacement wheel bearing (I guess technically called a "Wheel Hub"). As with any repair...just want things to go smoothly. I always get a bit nervous when disconnecting steering components...always concerned that things won't go back together exactly the same way...and then need a front end alignment (an unwanted expense).

Does anyone have any additional info or tips they can add before I start the disassembly/replacement?

Thanks much!
 
  #5  
Old 06-25-2019, 01:32 PM
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there are vids on Youtube. Also PB Blaster is your friend. If you follow the guides you will need to remove various parts to get access to the bearing's bolts on the back side (ball joints/control arms etc).
 
  #6  
Old 06-25-2019, 02:00 PM
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Just came across a video here on the Volvo Forums posted by member oragex...where a front wheel bearing is being replaced on a 2003 S60. Can anyone confirm if the procedure is similar on a 2008 S80...where possible disconnecting of a tie-rod end, ball joint, or strut is not needed?

Here's his post with the video:

https://volvoforums.com/forum/volvo-...deo-s60-75835/

Thanks
 

Last edited by pigoo3; 06-25-2019 at 02:16 PM. Reason: added info
  #7  
Old 06-25-2019, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by mt6127 View Post
there are vids on Youtube. Also PB Blaster is your friend. If you follow the guides you will need to remove various parts to get access to the bearing's bolts on the back side (ball joints/control arms etc).
Hello mt6127...thanks for the reply.

Yes YouTube is a great place to find DIY videos...usually one of my first "go-to" places for DIY help. When I checked YouTube back in September...I couldn't find any DIY videos for replacing the front wheel bearing on a 2008 S80 (or similar vintage). I'll check again...maybe something has been posted since then.

Thanks
 

Last edited by pigoo3; 06-25-2019 at 02:16 PM.
  #8  
Old 06-28-2019, 05:26 PM
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Hey guys...finally started this project today. Been having some trouble removing some frozen bolts. Currently I'm stuck on removing the Torx head bolt that secures the disk brake disk to the hub. I've sprayed it with PB Blaster & WD-40. I tapped on the Torx bolt & brake disk pretty hard around the bolt with a hammer to try to loosen things up...and not much luck.

I don't have a torch...so that's out of the question. And as many folks probably know...using a Torx socket is not a easy as using a 6-point socket. The splines on the torx socket want to bend...and the torx socket wants to slip out of the bolt pretty easy...so even using my 12", 18", or 24" breaker bar is not too much help.

1. Firstly...can someone verify that this Torx bolt is a "normal" threaded bolt (counter-clockwise to loosen, clockwise to tighten). In other words the Torx bolt is NOT a reversed thread bolt?

The hub bolt was "normal" ..and was removable turning counter-clockwise.

2. Anyone have any addditional ideas how to get this bolt removed?

Here are a couple photos of the bolt I'm talking about:







Thanks for all help.
 

Last edited by pigoo3; 06-28-2019 at 05:28 PM.
  #9  
Old 07-04-2019, 07:44 AM
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Quick update. Tried just about every trick in the book to get this torx bolt removed. Ended up snapping off the head of the torx bolt...this allowed me to remove the disk brake disk (along with removing the CV axle bolt). This torx bolt threads into the wheel bearing hub behind the disk brake disk. Since I'm replacing the wheel bearing hub...there's no need to drill out the broken bolt.

Project is still underway...various other "headaches" to deal with....and a lot of grunting & growning!
 
  #10  
Old 07-04-2019, 07:10 PM
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Ya just leave the broken bolt be
 
  #11  
Old 07-10-2019, 06:40 AM
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Finished the project yesterday. Needed to take the steering knuckle to a local repair shop to have the hub bearing pressed out & new one pressed in. I have a 12 ton shop press...but it didn't seem to be enough to get this one out.

Total project cost was about $120 ($70 for parts & $50 for the bearing pressing). Estimates from two local Volvo dealers was about $650. Always nice to save a few $$$.

Definitely learned a lot from this project (every different car you work on teaches you something new).
 
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