1998 V90 Wont Start -- Fuel Supply Issues - Volvo Forums - Volvo Enthusiasts Forum


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Old 07-19-2016, 02:11 AM
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Default 1998 V90 Wont Start -- Fuel Supply Issues

OK, to keep the story brief, I drove down to the local grocery store -- everything was working fine. Got back into the car and it wouldn't start. Had to end up getting it towed home.

First thing I did was check if the fuel pump was running by removing the gas cap and listening for it while my wife turned the key. I couldn't hear anything.

Next, I checked the fuel relay fuse in the fuse box under the hood. It was good. I was told to pull the fuel pump relay in the fuse box at the end of the dash and check for 12v across terminal 30. Only problem was I couldn't get the relay out. I ended up actually pulling off the relay's cover, exposing the windings and contacts. Well, since they were exposed, I reasoned I could still check if the relay was getting voltage. And when I turned on the key, the relay's contacts made momentary contact, and then when I cranked it, the contacts stayed in, well, contact. So my reasoning is that this relay is getting voltage, which means that both the relay and fuse under the hood are doing what they're supposed to do.

I was also told there's a wire running from the relay to the fuel pump and that I can check it for voltage, but I was given directions for a sedan, and this being a wagon, I don't know where to start looking for it. I'm also wondering if it's really necessary to do this check. I mean this is just to rule out any sort of physical damage in the wiring, right?

At this point, I'm really beginning to suspect the pump. One thing that I noticed that last time I drove it, when I started the car I heard a new noise. It was a mid-pitched -- well, not a whine, because it wasn't high pitched. Sort of a mid-pitched hum that I'd never heard before. But since the car was behaving normally, I didn't think any more of it -- until the car quit running. I asked my wife about this later and she said that she had noticed the same thing. So I guess I'm wondering if the fuel pump makes a louder sound than normal right before it goes out. Anybody know?

One think I haven't done yet is check the ignition system. I found out earlier today, as I was browsing through posts on related topics over at the other forum, that if this car's ignition system quits or develops problems, at least, it shuts down the fuel pump relays. So now I guess I need to pull a plug or two and check for spark. Have any of you run into this before?

Well, any and all advice is welcome. I need to get this car running, as soon as I possibly can. Thanks.
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Old 07-19-2016, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cooltouch View Post
OK, to keep the story brief, I drove down to the local grocery store -- everything was working fine. Got back into the car and it wouldn't start. Had to end up getting it towed home.

First thing I did was check if the fuel pump was running by removing the gas cap and listening for it while my wife turned the key. I couldn't hear anything.

Next, I checked the fuel relay fuse in the fuse box under the hood. It was good. I was told to pull the fuel pump relay in the fuse box at the end of the dash and check for 12v across terminal 30. Only problem was I couldn't get the relay out. I ended up actually pulling off the relay's cover, exposing the windings and contacts. Well, since they were exposed, I reasoned I could still check if the relay was getting voltage. And when I turned on the key, the relay's contacts made momentary contact, and then when I cranked it, the contacts stayed in, well, contact. So my reasoning is that this relay is getting voltage, which means that both the relay and fuse under the hood are doing what they're supposed to do.

I was also told there's a wire running from the relay to the fuel pump and that I can check it for voltage, but I was given directions for a sedan, and this being a wagon, I don't know where to start looking for it. I'm also wondering if it's really necessary to do this check. I mean this is just to rule out any sort of physical damage in the wiring, right?

At this point, I'm really beginning to suspect the pump. One thing that I noticed that last time I drove it, when I started the car I heard a new noise. It was a mid-pitched -- well, not a whine, because it wasn't high pitched. Sort of a mid-pitched hum that I'd never heard before. But since the car was behaving normally, I didn't think any more of it -- until the car quit running. I asked my wife about this later and she said that she had noticed the same thing. So I guess I'm wondering if the fuel pump makes a louder sound than normal right before it goes out. Anybody know?

One think I haven't done yet is check the ignition system. I found out earlier today, as I was browsing through posts on related topics over at the other forum, that if this car's ignition system quits or develops problems, at least, it shuts down the fuel pump relays. So now I guess I need to pull a plug or two and check for spark. Have any of you run into this before?

Well, any and all advice is welcome. I need to get this car running, as soon as I possibly can. Thanks.
If there is no fuel in the fuel rail, then it more than likely the fuel pump. I am assuming there is fuel in the tank - right? Only reason I'm asking is because our 960 died one time with the gas gauge showing 3/4 full when the tank was actually dry.

If there is no spark - then we have something else going on ...
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Old 07-21-2016, 02:27 PM
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Thanks for the reply. The fuel guage is accurate. In fact, we just filled the tank.

One other thing occurred to me just a while ago -- what if the contacts on the fuel pump relay are corroded or otherwise oxidized? If this were happening, then the relay would work, just no voltage getting through to the pump -- hence the reason for checking the voltage in the line running to the pump, I'm thinking.

Only problem with checking this is, I don't know how to remove that relay without destroying it. Is there such a thing as a relay puller? You know, like those handy little fuse pullers included in the fuse boxes?
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Old 07-21-2016, 02:37 PM
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Thanks for the reply. The fuel guage is accurate. In fact, we just filled the tank.

One other thing occurred to me just a while ago -- what if the contacts on the fuel pump relay are corroded or otherwise oxidized? If this were happening, then the relay would work, just no voltage getting through to the pump -- hence the reason for checking the voltage in the line running to the pump, I'm thinking.

Only problem with checking this is, I don't know how to remove that relay without destroying it. Is there such a thing as a relay puller? You know, like those handy little fuse pullers included in the fuse boxes?
not that I know of - it should just yank out. It's #9494448 in location "C" on the attached pdf. we have these for $18.32 if you need one

Tim
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Old 07-22-2016, 03:23 PM
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The relay you indicated is the main fuel system relay, which isn't the one I was talking about. According to the directions I was given, if the fuel pump relay cycles, which is the one located in the fuse panel on the driver's side end of the dash, this indicates that both the fuel system relay and its accompanying fuse, are good.

Actually, getting the relays out of their sockets -- the ones in the fuse panel under the hood -- isn't so bad because there's room to move. But the relays in the dash panel are packed close together and recessed into the dash somewhat so its really hard trying to get something down around its base. As for just yanking it out -- I tried that and the cover pulled off. I think the only way to get that relay out without destroying it is to come up with something that I can actually wedge under the relay's base to get it out. But as things sit, it would appear that I'll only need to remove it if there' s corrosion on the contacts. So I need to check the voltage on the wire from that relay to the pump.

I don't know where to look for the wire, though, so I'm thinking I'll just remove the cover for the fuel pump and check voltage at the pump.

Sound like a plan?
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Old 07-22-2016, 03:27 PM
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sounds like a plan - not a very common relay to fail - but there is always that one ...
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