Volvo S40 The S40 is Volvo's most affordable sedan with all the amenities of a luxury sports car.

Coil Spring Strut Assembly

  #1  
Old 02-08-2019, 07:59 AM
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Default Coil Spring Strut Assembly

HI...

Why Am I having hard time finding a Coil Spring Strut Assembly for my 2006 volvo s40? I can find it for any model but my model. Do these really need to be purchased separately?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 02-08-2019, 08:59 AM
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I noticed that, too (for my similar V50). It wasn't a problem, since I prefer to keep the original springs - there's seldom anything wrong with 'em, they're probably higher-quality than any aftermarket springs you'll find, and you won't end up accidentally changing your ride height. They're not difficult to remove and reinstall on the new struts, but you do have to have a set of spring compressors and a bit of common sense (and/or self-preservation instinct). ;-)
 
  #3  
Old 02-08-2019, 12:59 PM
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So I will be ok with buying a strut and transferring everything else over?
 
  #4  
Old 02-08-2019, 05:04 PM
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Zippy, I would say yes. FWIW, the el cheapo spring compressors I used had no problem compressing the springs on my V50's struts (same as your S40). There are some common-sense issues to think through (like making sure the compressors are on straight, that the locking pins are engaged, and that you don't take apart the strut BEFORE the spring is fully compressed... and then that you get the spring aligned properly on the seats. All pretty simple DIY stuff.

FWIW, I would recommend replacing the strut mounts (on top), as the bearings can get wonky, and they're not very expensive, and the originals are likely to fail before you wear out the new struts.

I would also recommend watching the portion of the video I recently posted (and am in the process of re-posting, since I discovered that it uploaded as a "private" video so no one can open it... sigh). A few minutes in I show you how to use a piece of scrap metal to get your steering knuckle off the strut cylinder without a hammer, brute force or any cursing... I promise! ;-) Hopefully it'll be fixed by this evening.
 
  #5  
Old 02-08-2019, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by habbyguy View Post
Zippy, I would say yes. FWIW, the el cheapo spring compressors I used had no problem compressing the springs on my V50's struts (same as your S40). There are some common-sense issues to think through (like making sure the compressors are on straight, that the locking pins are engaged, and that you don't take apart the strut BEFORE the spring is fully compressed... and then that you get the spring aligned properly on the seats. All pretty simple DIY stuff.

FWIW, I would recommend replacing the strut mounts (on top), as the bearings can get wonky, and they're not very expensive, and the originals are likely to fail before you wear out the new struts.

I would also recommend watching the portion of the video I recently posted (and am in the process of re-posting, since I discovered that it uploaded as a "private" video so no one can open it... sigh). A few minutes in I show you how to use a piece of scrap metal to get your steering knuckle off the strut cylinder without a hammer, brute force or any cursing... I promise! ;-) Hopefully it'll be fixed by this evening.
Do you think the auto zone spring compressor will work to compress the spring so I can change out the strut and the strut mount?
A video on this would be very very helpful ...

Thanks
 
  #6  
Old 02-08-2019, 08:08 PM
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here is what I watched

 
  #7  
Old 02-08-2019, 11:41 PM
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That's pretty much how it's done. There are some differences (how the strut is bolted to the knuckle being the biggest). And he didn't replace the strut mount, which can be a mistake. I'm not familiar with the Autozone compressor, but since our cars are a lot lighter than a whole lot of other vehicles out there, I can't imagine that their compressor wouldn't work just fine.
 
  #8  
Old 02-09-2019, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by habbyguy View Post
That's pretty much how it's done. There are some differences (how the strut is bolted to the knuckle being the biggest). And he didn't replace the strut mount, which can be a mistake. I'm not familiar with the Autozone compressor, but since our cars are a lot lighter than a whole lot of other vehicles out there, I can't imagine that their compressor wouldn't work just fine.
the compressor the guy used in that video is the same that the autozone offers for rent. I have taken mine off and now im just waiting for new ones to come in.
 
  #9  
Old 02-09-2019, 10:19 AM
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They're a little different from mine, which have pins that are designed to "capture" the coil so that (I suppose) it won't slip off.. seems unlikely once there's any tension anyway. I suppose it might also keep the compressor parts from becoming projectiles if the compressor broke... but I can't imagine that happening, particularly with the relatively wimpy springs on our Volvos.
 
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