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Oil Trap Replaced with no luck

  #1  
Old 09-29-2013, 10:40 AM
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Default Oil Trap Replaced with no luck

Hi,

I replaced my oil Trap with crankcase vent hose. I have inspected all the holes after cleaning. All seems Ok.

My Air hose for throttle body also gets dirty because of oil coming from Oil trap hose.

Since I Changed oil trap I still see smoke coming out from my Dip stick which considered to be oil trap clogged as per many experts.

Any idea where I am wrong or how I can fix it. Will appreciate.
 
  #2  
Old 09-29-2013, 12:10 PM
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What engine? Turbo or NA? Mileage?

The purpose of the oil trap is to control blow-by gases (gases that escape the rings) in the engine that result from combustion.

Did you check the openings at block where the oil trap connects? These often plug up SOLID. Also, check for vacuum line and air induction leaks. If your engine is significantly worn, it is possible that there is more blow-by than can be handled by the oil trap system.
 
  #3  
Old 09-29-2013, 01:36 PM
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S80 1999 2.9 Non Turbo with 166000 KM Mileage on it.

yes I checked, cleaned and look like this when I was connecting new PCV.
http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/...p/100_4213.jpg

Engine is in a good shape so far I believe and I change the oil earliest plus I often do long trips as well.
 
  #4  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:24 PM
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There are 2 openings into the block that the trap fits into....Upper & lower. What did the lower opening look like? Did you confirm it was clear? It is hard to see in there, that far down. If you are still experiencing excess gases through the dipstick, re-check all the hoses you installed when you put in the new trap.

ALSO check the valve on top of the engine that connects to the plastic induction pipe (PTC - Pressure Temperature Coefficient - valve). It is easy to identify: top of engine under a small plastic cover, just behind the oil cap...there is an electrical connection in the front of the valve and a rubber connector (connected to an aluminum pipe) coming in from the left (driver's side). On my 1996 850 Turbo, this valve is installed in the induction pipe right next to the turbo. It was completely plugged up SOLID with crud and had to be DRILLED out.

 
  #5  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:16 PM
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GMurghy, You are right cannot see easily lower hose but as per upper one (Like the picture I posted) I knocked the lower on which seems same as upper one.....but as you said some times drilling...seems scary but ....are you sure that it can be hard enough to drill the lower hose.

Since there is oil (coming from Oil trap T line) in my Air hose coming from MAF to Throttle body...I am sure that T is clear.....regarding PTC...since it is Volvo s80 1999 2.9 non turbo confirmed by few sources that this car has no PTC valve.

will appreciate more ideas
 
  #6  
Old 10-06-2013, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by majorcode View Post
S80 1999 2.9 Non Turbo with 166000 KM Mileage on it.

yes I checked, cleaned and look like this when I was connecting new PCV.
http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/...p/100_4213.jpg

Engine is in a good shape so far I believe and I change the oil earliest plus I often do long trips as well.
Thanks for posting these great pictures of this project. They will be great help for someone wanting/ needing to this to their car.
 
  #7  
Old 10-07-2013, 10:39 AM
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Smoke coming out of the dipstick is an indicator of excessive crankcase pressure. Could be excessive blowby from the engine itself too. Have you checked the engine compression or done a leakdown test yet?
 
  #8  
Old 10-07-2013, 01:50 PM
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Thanks Brad, seems logical. But I did not able to find single article how to perform this test, would advice how to this compression test my self?
 
  #9  
Old 10-07-2013, 02:35 PM
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The compression test can be done easily by yourself as long as you know how to remove the spark plugs and disable the ignition on the car. Basically you just want the engine turning over without the car actually starting. Tools for compression testing are cheap.

Harbor Freight is a good place to get cheap specialty tools locally if you don't want to buy online. Any local parts store will likely sell a kit too but not nearly as cheap.

Here is a link to a compression tester
8 Piece Automotive Compression Test Kit

The leak-down tester is a more skilled project but can also be done yourself if you have an air compressor. This test should be done AFTER a compression test has been done. IF the compression test shows a low number on one or more of the cylinders then you do the leak-down test to get to the bottom of the leak. Here is the link to this tool. With the leakdown tester you have test each cylinder at top-dead-center. If you do not know how to get each cylinder at top-dead-center then I would suggest you leave this test to a professional. The idea in a leak down test is that you pressurize the cylinder with air and find out where the air is leaking out at. If it comes out the tailpipe it's an exhaust valve, if it comes out the intake it's an intake valve, if it comes out the dipstick it's a compression ring, if it comes out the PCV/valve cover it's likely a valve seal, if it comes out the radiator it's likely a headgasket.


Here is a link to a leak-down tester if you are tackling it yourself.
Cylinder Leak-Down Tester
 
  #10  
Old 10-07-2013, 02:46 PM
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I forgot to mention the compression numbers. There is two ways of looking at compressions numbers. The specifications, and the static pressure. The specs can be found almost anywhere online. The static pressure is the pressure relative to the other cylinders. Take for instance your car.

The normal range is 189-218 PSI, however if your car has had head work done such as shaving the head due to it being warped, the compression numbers may be higher. Or if it's a high mileage engine the compression numbers may fall under the minimum but still run very well. What you're looking for is anything out of order like a cylinder with 135PSI while the rest are at 190PSI. That would indicate a weak cylinder, while this may not necessarily cause a misfire, it will cause excessive blowby.

If all of your numbers are below specifications and it runs very well but smokes out the dipstick that would also be an indication of excessive blowby.
 
  #11  
Old 10-09-2013, 05:10 AM
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Brad, Thanks a lot, really appreciate for detailed help.

Cheers!
 
  #12  
Old 10-09-2013, 06:47 PM
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No problem! I will try and start frequenting this forum with the others I go to. I "flip" cars for a living so I run into all kinds of gems with headaches just like this when I buy them as cheap as I do lol
 
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